5 Things You’ll Need to Teach Your Gen Z Employees as they Enter the Workforce

Generation Z

Given that Gen Z is estimated to be one third of the population by 2020 and will outnumber their Millennial counterparts by more than one million, it is time to take notice of them.

Generation Zers will be the first to tell you they feel like their smartphone is as indispensable as a body part. Despite this, they are not entirely clueless about how to communicate. A full 78% feel that face-to-face communication is best when expressing feelings.

Still, there are a number of things you can plan on teaching Gen Z employees as they begin to join your ranks.

1. When to pick up the phone.

74% admit communication in person or over the phone doesn’t come naturally to them, according to a recent BridgeWorks study. Consequently, many routine matters will get bogged down in email that takes much more time to process than a quick phone call.

2. How to focus.

Raised in a world of six-second Vine videos, Gen Zers have limited attention spans. Passive attention measures a mere eight seconds and active attention 12 minutes, according to a study published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The upshot? They can handle, and will expect, working on multiple projects with competing priorities.

3. How to ask for help.

They are a self-reliant bunch. Raised like mini-adults by their Gen X parents, it may not naturally occur to them to ask for help. Even when they are stuck. Model asking for help and show them that it is perfectly okay for them to reach out.

4. Patience.

Growing up in a world of Amazon, Zappos and other next-day and same-day delivery services, this generation expects that things will be delivered (at work and elsewhere) nearly instantaneously. And in working order. If they have to wait or if the product or service does not meet their high standards, they will take it as a sign of disrespect. Teaching them that the world of work does not deliver in the same way as Amazon will help them be more tolerant and understanding.

5. How to make small talk.

As they note about themselves, communicating in person does not come naturally to them. Courting clients, making friends at work and networking in their professional field will inevitably involve small talk, a staple of in-person communication. Make small talk with them by asking what they did on the weekend, how their commute was and what’s happening on the music scene (or whatever their area of interest) and you will model this important skill.

Follow these tips and you will get the most out these optimistic, resilient, entrepreneurial young adults.

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    Generation Z

    Just when you’ve started to get your head around what makes the Millennials tick, the conversation on generations is changing.

    Say hello to Gen Z.

    Generation Z are those born after 1995.  It’s tempting to think that they are like Millennials on steroids. But that is far from the truth. Gen Zers were raised in the midst of the Great Recession. They came of age in a time when the norm was same-day or next-day delivery of just about anything. True digital natives, they learned to swipe before they learned to talk. For half their lives, they’ve experienced an African American President.

    Meanwhile, their older counterparts, the Millennials (born between 1980 and 1994) came of age in a time marked by 9/11 and other terrorist attacks, political scandals and computer technology starting to become second-nature.

    Oddly enough, Gen Z has far more in common with their great grandparents, who came of age just after the Great Depression. And at 26% of the US population and outnumbering their Millennial counterparts by more than 1 million, Generation Z is important to get to know.

    Just what exactly are the top priorities of this generation that is about to enter the workforce?

    1. They are intent on finishing college and finding a stable job.

    We might see more students graduate in the desirable four-year window, something colleges and universities will delight in.  Their interest in finishing college is driven by practical motives. Most Gen Z college students are seeing college as a route to get a skill set that will enable them to be gainfully employed rather than a time to pursue a topic they are passionate about.

     

    Many in this generation have seen their parents and close family friends lose investments, lose their homes and lose their jobs during the 2008 recession and its aftermath. According to a  Goldman Sachs poll, Generation Z reported that finding a stable job was one of their top priorities and ranks job stability above travel, working out and spending time with family and friends.

    2. They are thrifty and they save.

    The same Goldman Sachs poll showed that Gen Zers are concerned with saving for the future and coming out of college with as little debt as possible. 71% of them report being focused on saving for the future and a full 60% of them have savings accounts. Their largely Gen X parents have taught them to save, much as their great-grandparents did with their children in a post-Depression world.  Their focus on the future is backed up by their actions. A Youthlogix study reported that two thirds of Gen Z said they will take the time to go online and find a coupon for a purchase, compared with only 46% of Millennials.

    3. They are inherently entrepreneurial.

    From role models like Mark Zuckerberg and Evan Spiegel to YouTube stars such as Meg DeAngelis and Tyler Oakley, Generation Z was raised on entrepreneurial icons. One study cites as many as 72% of teens surveyed want to start their own business. Coming of age during the Great Recession has created an impetus to take control of their employment and financial future in an action-oriented manner. A 2015 US Census Bureau report indicated one third of Millennials were living with their parents. Generation Z is taking matters into their own hands and don’t want to be living in mom and dad’s basement. Ever.

    In the coming weeks, the Working Conversation blog will continue its exploration of Generation Z, helping you communicate better with this generation and teaching them what they need to know to succeed at work. They’ll be joining your ranks before you know it.

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    change

    “Our organization is innovating like crazy lately,” Joe recently remarked to me.

    “Oh,” I responded, my curiosity piqued. “What sorts of innovations are happening?”

    “We’re converting our software development to Agile,” he shared, citing a now decades old methodology.

    Joe, like many others, was confusing change and managing change with innovation.

    Innovation is, by definition, a revolutionary new idea. When Agile was first developed, it certainly was an innovation. Implementing it now is change.

    Change is, by definition, to become different by doing one thing instead of another.  For example, converting from waterfall (or whatever other software development methodology they may have been using), is a change.

    Both are important.

    And, it is critically important to understand the distinction.

    It makes a difference in the methodologies you use, the approach you take to your work and how you design the work environment.

    Is your team or organization truly innovating? Or are you managing change?

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    I’m often asked, “What’s the best solution for our work environment: open office, bullpens, work from home, or what?”

    It’s a great question and one that does not have a one-size-fits-all answer.  No one likes to hear, “It depends,” and my answer still is “It depends.”

    Specifically, it depends on these three things:

    1. Need for intense collaboration.

    Imaging employees standing in front of a white board, diagramming software functionality, a marketing campaign or any other function.

    Collaboration, right?

    Now, what happens next is critical.

    Do those same employees need to continue to make sense of their work and collaborate out loud during the creative part and the execution part of those functions?  How do they score on a scale of 1 – 10 (in which 1 is low need and 10 is high) on their need to collaborate out loud throughout the design and execution?

    Anything less than an 8 needs quiet space for deep work.

    8 and over? Put them in a bullpen or provide them with low-walled cubes, AND make sure to put some noise insulation between those teams and other teams who have different needs. And put some insulated walls between them and other teams who have the same needs, so that they are not distracted by the out loud work of others.

    2. Need for Deep Work.

    Imagine a financial analyst tasked with projecting the next quarter’s earnings in a wildly fluctuating marketplace, including the launch of a major new product from your organization nearly simultaneously with a similar product from your top competitor.

    Now imagine that analyst spinning out various scenarios, calculating profit and loss and shareholder reaction.  All in the midst of dozens and dozens of colleagues whose work demands that they work out loud.

    The analyst’s need to perform deep work (a term I’m borrowing from Cal Newport’s book by the same name) demands a space free from distraction.

    Our best thinking is accomplished when we disconnect from other conversations and interruptions (including technology).

    Take a close look at the output of the job function and ask, as a percentage of full-time work week, how often does this function engage in deep work?  Anything over 40% requires a quiet work environment where noise and interruption are kept to a minimum.

    3. Balance between intense collaboration and Deep Work.

    Some job functions will require intense collaboration and deep work in relatively equal measure.

    Imagine a usability team who is working to make improvements in the design of a product. They come together for intense collaboration, gathering around a whiteboard for the better part of a week, working out loud.  Then, each with their own part of the design to work on (or the usability test plan, etc.), they retreat to research best practices and do the more intense, creative parts of their job, requiring deep work.

    In this case, hoteling, where team members have access to different spaces that support both out loud work and quiet independent work, would be a terrific fit. (The trick here is adequate square footage of each and a calendaring system that enables availability – both when scheduled and when needed on an impromptu basis, but that’s a topic for another article).

    Yes, it depends.

    When you’ve accurately assessed these factors by interviewing your employees, evaluating the needs of their job functions and observing their best work, then and only then, will your specific flavor of “It depends” become crystal clear.

     

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    Future of work

    The design of work – from how we meet the needs of our customers to how we communicate internally to the way our work space is designed – is changing.  The workplace of 2025 will look much different than the workplace of today.

    Here are my top three prognostications for what the future of work holds.

    1. Move over, Millennials.

    In 2020 Millennials will make up 50% of the workforce and by 2025 that number will be 75%. Close on their heels are Gen Z, or those born in 1997 and later. These digital natives think differently about work than their predecessors. They were raised using technology to communicate. They were raised on an strange cocktail of autonomy and oversight (think: plans a $3000 family vacation at age 12; parent drops off forgotten items at school at age 16). They demand a larger purpose in their work, like the Millennials.  And they will demand even more flexibility in how work is structured.

    • Where they work (office, home, coffee shop, mountain top).
    • When they work (Nine to five? Nah. Work and non-work activities will be far more blended.)
    • How they work.

     

    2. Hollywood, here we come.

    Often dubbed “The Hollywood Model” where experts come together for duration of the project and then go their separate ways, project-based work will thrive as a business structure. The entrepreneurial trend that lends Uber and Fivrr success today, creates an autonomous work environment where people come together to share what they do best for the people and places who need it and will pay for it.  Project-based work already exists to a large extent within organizational walls, with people coming together for the weeks, months or years it takes to complete the project.  By 2025, however, this trend will reach far beyond corporate walls with experts for hire coming together to do the strategic work of organizations, not just give rides to the airport.

     

    3. Work environments get wilder still, then stabilize.

    Today we see organizations quick to implement the “open-office” concept, only to reverse it several years later, putting the cubicle walls back up.  The next several years will continue to see wild fluctuations in how organizations build out their space: hoteling, pods and bullpens, off-site co-working, work from home and more.  By 2025, leadership will have developed the confidence to see that their organization and their people (and by extension, their culture) have their own distinct needs. They will collaborate with their people to intentionally design spaces and places that best support their functional work, with an eye toward when to collaborate and when to have quiet time for deep, thoughtful work.

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