Withholding Information: A Weapon in (false) Job Security

information-hoarding

Withholding Information: A Weapon in (false) Job Security

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Category : business communication

information-hoardingJeannie worked at ACME Corp in a field with government regulation, and although the regulations were slow to change, she and her department were expected to keep on top of them.

Jeannie was pleasant and fun to work for. She always had a kind word and a question or three about the family and other topics of importance to her colleagues and direct reports.

After several decades with little change, a variety of factors both political and economic, prompted rapid and swift change in her industry.  Regulations changed. ACME Corp needed to change too.

A team of six people reported to Jeannie during this somewhat turbulent time of changing regulations. Over the years, Jeannie had divided up tasks and responsibilities among her team members in such a way that none of them could clearly understand the “big picture.”

Her employees were keeping abreast of the changes in the industry and regulations and that, in turn, prompted questions from them. They needed to see, more and more, how their work was interrelated and how the changing regulations impacted the processes they followed.

“No problem, don’t worry yourself about it,” was always Jeannie’s reply when her team members asked even routine and basic questions about the bigger picture. “It’s my job to worry about those things.”

But it became more and more clear that if Jeannie was worrying about those things, she wasn’t letting on.

She held the purse-strings on organizational knowledge tight and her emotions even tighter.

The more the industry and the organization changed, the more tightly wound Jeannie became.

Senior leaders at ACME became aware of the situation. It was the perfect storm that they hadn’t seen coming: Jeannie was heavily invested in the organization (her professional identity hinged entirely on her current role and ACME) and she was faced with significant changes in her field and she hadn’t kept up.  Her tenure with the organization and her information hoarding yielded power disproportionate to her position.

Senior management feared firing her because of all the organizational knowledge she held.  They feared the status quo even more: a breach in compliance could cost them their license to be in business.

So they coached and prodded and pried. But they could not crack Jeannie. She was a tough nut.

And she was a liability. So they “re-organized” her right out of the organization.

Withholding information, the tactic Jeannie clung to in hopes of job security, was eventually what “done her in.”

Where do you see information hoarding? How is it compromising your team or organization’s success?

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